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specific nutrition by age and gender

 

 
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references

 

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Colds

see also Stay Well Formulation

note summer 2006 - vitamin C does reduce cold duration and frequency - these are notes from The Linus Pauling Institute Research Report Spring/Summer 2006.

1) Notes from The Linus Pauling Institute Research Report Fall/Winter 2004. From "Vitamin E and the Common Cold" In a study published in JAMA by Tufts University, 200 IU of synthetic vitamin E resulted in a 20% decrease in colds in elderly nursing home patients. Studies with at least 1 g of vitamin C per day [like 500 mg twice a day] shortened the duration of colds by 25% and reduced symptoms. "Perhaps the consumption of both vitamin E and vitamin C supplements may be the most effective strategy." So in the fall of 2004, the Linus Pauling Institute finally considers what Nutrition Investigator has been stating since 1999. Taking 500 mg of vitamin C twice a day and 400 iu of vitamin E once a day may dramatically reduce the risk of colds (and of age-associated diseases like heart attacks, stroke, cancer, and Alzheimer's.)

2)There is substantial evidence to support taking fish oil regularly to boost immune function.

3) Vitamin C research described supports taking extra vitamin C (1000x2), and zinc lozenges (1am, 1pm) a day at the onset of concern of a cold, for a period of a few days. Zinc on a regular basis has some hazards associated, and vitamin C above 500x2 is of no benefit except at the first onset of symptoms suggesting a cold might be starting. However, a cohort study in 2002 found no effect.

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